Sunday, December 03, 2006

The LA Times' Reality Check on CIRM

The Los Angeles Times, California's largest newspaper with nearly one million circulation, Sunday published an overview of the state's stem cell agency, headlined "Reality Check for Stem Cell Optimism."

Written by Mary Engel, the story spoke of the "long and slow scientific journey" facing CIRM.
"Even with the $150-million state loan approved recently to kick-start work stalled by legal challenges, there are no breakthroughs in sight. Gone are the allusions to healing such afflictions as spinal cord injuries and Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases that dominated the 2004 campaign for Proposition 71. In fact, scientists say, there is no guarantee of cures — certainly not any time soon — from the measure that was optimistically titled the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Act."
Engel's piece included a host of interviews with a variety of folks interested in the agency. She also had an interesting quote from Sen. Deborah Ortiz, D-Sacramento, concerning some of the hype involved in the campaign for Prop. 71. It reflected one of the realities of political life – one sometimes not fully understood by those who criticize the overblown rhetoric of the campaign.
"'A campaign requires a message to be driven home,' (Ortiz) said. 'You can't raise those hopes and then say, 'Oh by the way, it may take us 10 or 15 years.' That's just the nature of campaigns.'"
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3 comments:

  1. I am not quite sure of the meaning of the text:

    It reflected one of the realities of political life – one sometimes not fully understood by those who criticize the overblown rhetoric of the campaign.

    "'A campaign requires a message to be driven home,' (Ortiz) said. 'You can't raise those hopes and then say, 'Oh by the way, it may take us 10 or 15 years.' That's just the nature of campaigns.'"


    If one were in the private sector, one would go to jail for his sort of thing.

    See
    http://ipbiz.blogspot.com/2006/11/patrick-kelly-of-united-fuel-cell.html

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  2. It happens all the time in the private sector. Microsoft's claims about the benefits of its software are one example. With 10 years experience as a business editor of a major newspaper, I can assure you it is commonplace. Much of it is repeated with no caveats in the media.

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  3. Your response might seem to be a non sequitur. The issue here is duping investors/taxpayers about a HYPOTHETICAL, TOTALLY UNREALISTIC future. Microsoft's claims about a real product can be tested. There are different laws as between INVESTORS and CONSUMERS. Sadly, one infers that nothing protects taxpayers in California.

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